Britain announces 129 additional deaths for Covid-19


Britain today recorded 128 additional coronavirus deaths in Saturday’s lowest increase after the lockout, bringing the total number of victims in the UK to 42,589 – while plans to suppress the two-meter social distance rule and letting drinkers congregate outside pubs has been revealed.

Today’s figure is the smallest jump since Saturday March 21, two days before the lockdown, when 56 people died of the virus, and marks a significant drop from the record high of 1,115 deaths recorded on Saturday April 18.

In comparison, 181 deaths from coronavirus were announced last Saturday, 204 the week before and 215 on Saturday May 30.

More than 303,000 people have now tested positive for viral disease, after 1,295 Britons were diagnosed on the last day – but millions of cases went unreported due to a lack of widespread testing at the start of crisis.

It comes after government scientists approved Boris Johnson’s plan to halve the social distance rule by two meters so that pubs, restaurants and hotels can reopen early next month as a result of a dramatic drop in the coronavirus alert level.

Britain’s threat level was reduced from level four to level three on Friday after scientists confirmed that the epidemic is decreasing by 4% every day and that the reproductive rate “ R ” – the number mean of people infected with a Covid patient – had remained less than one.

As part of a series of new easing measures to be announced by the Prime Minister over the next fortnight, the beer gardens will be monitored by staff to apply the rules of social distancing and pubs will automatically have the right to serve alcohol to people to drink on the sidewalk in the street.

Bars will be asked to strictly monitor their beer gardens to ensure social distancing and customers will be encouraged to order their drinks via a phone app. In restaurants, staff will not be able to set tables in advance while hotel staff is asked to place room service on the door steps to minimize contact between staff and customers.

In other coronavirus developments today:

  • Drinkers have gathered outside pubs across Britain in the midst of plans to give the green light to the outdoor garden and street, as scientists lead the way for Boris to reduce the rule of two meters;
  • Fewer than 10 countries will have an “air bridge” to the United Kingdom and travelers arriving from elsewhere may have to pay for a COVID-19 test to avoid a 14-day quarantine;
  • The government has been accused of underestimating the number of coronavirus deaths at the height of the crisis after it emerged that more than 1,000 people died in the UK every day for 22 consecutive days;
  • Boris plans to bring all children back to school in September as Education Secretary Gavin Williamson announced plans to double the size of classroom “bubbles” to allow up to 30 students in class at a time;
  • The “ R ” number hovers near one in the northwest, the Midlands and London – but scientists say it’s not time to panic as fewer cases make measurements more volatile.

Issue 10's Scientific Advisory Committee, SAGE, found that the reproductive rate - the average number of people infected with each Covid-19 patient - is still between 0.7 and 0.9, which means that the coronavirus is firmly behind after terrorizing Britain for months. It must stay below one or Britain will face another crisis. Separate data released for the first time also claimed that the UK's current growth rate - how the number of new daily cases evolves day by day - could be as low as minus 4%. If the rate becomes greater than zero, the disease could again get out of control

Issue 10’s Scientific Advisory Committee, SAGE, found that the reproductive rate – the average number of people infected with each Covid-19 patient – is still between 0.7 and 0.9, which means that the coronavirus is firmly behind after terrorizing Britain for months. It must stay below one or Britain will face another crisis. Separate data released for the first time also claimed that the UK’s current growth rate – how the number of new daily cases evolves day by day – could be as low as minus 4%. If the rate becomes greater than zero, the disease could again get out of control

Three men enjoyed their pints in Battersea, London, as pubs served drinks for revelers to enjoy outdoors on Boris Johnson's plan to reduce the social distance rule by two meters

Three men enjoyed their pints in Battersea, London, as pubs served drinks for revelers to enjoy outdoors on Boris Johnson’s plan to reduce the social distance rule by two meters

A group of friends cheers with their pints of beer after ordering it to go to Victoria at Battersea, south west London

A group of friends cheers with their pints of beer after ordering it to go to Victoria at Battersea, south west London

A woman breastfeeds two pints and a cocktail at her table at the Victoria in Battersea, south west London, Saturday afternoon

A woman breastfeeds two pints and a cocktail at her table at the Victoria in Battersea, south west London, Saturday afternoon

A staff member serves a customer at an outdoor bar in Clapham, London, this morning. Lots of people flocked to bars for a drink in outdoor spaces today

A staff member serves a customer at an outdoor bar in Clapham, London, this morning. Lots of people flocked to bars for a drink in outdoor spaces today

There will also be a ban on self-service buffets while towels and cutlery should only be taken out with food, as per the new Times guidelines. The guide also states that all menus must be disposable and discarded after each use.

All hotel guests who fall ill will be obliged to isolate themselves at home or in their hotel room which will be locked for 72 hours after their departure. Gyms will also be asked to impose social distances between their machines – although they are not expected to reopen until the end of the year.

WHAT MEASURES WILL BE ANNOUNCED DURING THE NEXT TWO WEEKS?

Britain’s threat level was reduced from level four to level three on Friday after scientists confirmed that the epidemic is decreasing by 4% every day and that the reproductive rate “ R ” – the number mean of people infected with a Covid patient – had remained less than one.

Boris Johnson is about to announce a wave of measures that will allow the hospitality and travel industry to be operational and bring children back to school over the summer.

Over the next two weeks, the PM is expected to announce that:

The beer gardens will be monitored by staff to enforce social distancing rules and pubs will automatically have the right to serve alcohol to people drinking on the sidewalk in the street;

Pubs will be asked to strictly monitor their beer gardens to ensure social distancing and customers will be encouraged to order their drinks via a phone app;

In restaurants, staff will not be able to set tables in advance while hotel staff is asked to place room service on the door steps to minimize contact between staff and customers;

Self-service buffets will be prohibited and towels and cutlery should only be brought with food;

Hotel guests who fall ill will be obliged to isolate themselves at home or in their hotel room which will be locked for 72 hours after their departure;

Gyms will also be asked to impose social distances between their machines – although they should not reopen until the end of the year;

The British will be allowed to travel to 10 countries without having to isolate themselves for 14 days as part of the “air bridges” plan;

The school “bubbles” – which currently allow only 15 students in a class at a time – will be doubled into classes of 30, while the Secretary of Education, Gavin Williamson, undertakes to return all the children to the school. school by September;

NHS bosses will write to more than 2 million vulnerable patients in England who have been protecting themselves since March to assure them that it is safe to go to stores and exercise outdoors;

Two families may be allowed to enter “houses in” bubbles of support “from each other and stay overnight, according to Whitehall Sources.

Clubbers may have to wait a while before they can hit the dance floor, as they pose problems of social distancing. Temperature controls and hand sanitizer at the door could be part of the British night when the clubs finally reopen.

Ministers are also negotiating with a dozen other countries – including Spain, Portugal, Greece and France – to set up “ air bridges ” that would allow tourists to travel between them this summer without mandatory quarantine 14 days.

School “bubbles” – which currently allow only 15 students in one class at a time – will also be doubled to allow all children to return to school in September and resume classes.

And NHS bosses will write to more than 2 million vulnerable patients in England who have been protecting themselves since March to assure them that it is safe to go to the shops and exercise outdoors.

The ministers will publish a law next week to push an “outdoor revolution” in the country’s hotel industry.

Outdoor meals and beverages will be actively encouraged as clients are much less likely to contract coronavirus in the fresh air.

However, there are concerns that long lines outside are an attractive target for terrorism. The council indicates that the queues must be directed around the terminals and other barriers which protect the pedestrians.

But some pubs have vowed to continue anyway. Jack Stein, chief executive of his father Rick Stein’s restaurant chain, told The Telegraph: “ It’s not just about business, we’re British and everyone just wants to go to the pub.

When we can serve that first piece of turbot and that first pint in our pub, it will be fantastic and the whole industry will breathe a sigh of relief.

Last night, a government source revealed that the scientific advisers were now “completely comfortable” in reducing the restriction – provided other precautions were in place.

This may include ensuring that buildings are properly ventilated, greater use of masks or the installation of screens where people may be too close to each other.

This comes after it was revealed that the “ R ” reproduction rate of the coronavirus is about to get out of control in three parts of England, despite the downgrade of the UK alert level and its intends to end the lockout within a fortnight.

SAGE scientists estimate that R – the average number of people infected with a Covid-19 patient – approaches the dreaded number of one in London, the North West and the Midlands, although it is lower for the United Kingdom as a whole.

But scientists told MailOnline today that using R to assess the UK crisis is becoming less useful due to the declining prevalence of the disease in the community.

The R would be between 0.8 and 1.0 in the Midlands, the highest of all regions of Great Britain, and slightly lower in London and in the North West, where estimates place it between 0.7 and 1.0.

The reproduction rate of Covid-19 must remain below one or the cases will start to grow again exponentially and the United Kingdom could be faced with a second wave of virus.

For example, an R level of only 1.2 would mean that 10 infected people would transmit the virus to 12 more people. These 12 people in turn would infect 14 people who would then spread the disease to more than 17 people, and so on.

Carl Heneghan, a professor of evidence-based medicine at the University of Oxford, said that the fewer the number of infected patients, the greater the margin of error when estimating the R-value, especially when examination of specific regions of the United Kingdom.

For example, if there are only 10 cases and one of them infects three people, it would dramatically increase the rate of R and distort the mean.

Professor Heneghan told MailOnline, “There is a problem with using the R rate now, because the infection is going down to very low levels. R fluctuates, so you expect R to become a less accurate measure of the epidemic. No one will control the rate of R when 80% of people are asymptomatic and the virus circulates at such low levels.

“ What really matters is the data such as hospital admissions, 999 calls, GP visit rates and interactions with NHS 111. And when we look at them, they all go down so reassuring.

This comes after the UK “Covid-alert” level was lowered from level four to level three after scientists confirmed that the epidemic was decreasing by 4% every day.

Bars will be asked to strictly monitor their beer gardens to ensure social distancing and customers will be encouraged to order their drinks via a phone app. In the photo, a London pub serving customers this week

Bars will be asked to strictly monitor their beer gardens to ensure social distancing and customers will be encouraged to order their drinks via a phone app. In the photo, a London pub serving customers this week

Boris Johnson expected to announce a series of new measures over the next two weeks to end the British foreclosure

Beer gardens will be patrolled to enforce social distancing rules under new guidelines for the hospitality industry

As part of a series of new measures to be announced by Boris Johnson in the next fortnight to end the UK foreclosure, breweries will be monitored to enforce social distancing rules

UK Covid-alert level downgraded from level four to level three following dramatic reduction in new infections, hospitalizations and deaths

UK Covid-alert level downgraded from level four to level three following dramatic reduction in new infections, hospitalizations and deaths

WHAT IS THE R NUMBER? AND HOW IS IT CALCULATED?

WHAT IS R0?

Each infectious disease is given a reproduction number, known as R0 – pronounced “R naught”.

This is a value that represents the average number of people that a sick person will infect.

WHAT IS R0 FOR COVID-19?

The R0 value for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, was estimated by the COVID-19 response team at Imperial College at 2.4 in the United Kingdom before the lockout started.

But some experts analyzing epidemics around the world have estimated that it could be closer to the 6.6 mark.

Estimates of R0 vary because the real size of the pandemic remains a mystery and the speed of spread of the virus depends on the environment.

It will spread faster in a densely populated city where people travel on the subway than in a rural community where people drive everywhere.

HOW DOES IT COMPARE WITH OTHER VIRUSES?

It is thought to be at least three times more contagious than the coronavirus that causes MERS (0.3 – 0.8).

Measles is one of the most contagious infectious diseases and has an R0 value of 12 to 18 if it is not controlled. Widespread vaccination keeps it suppressed in most developed countries.

It is estimated that the R0 of chickenpox is between 10 and 12, while the seasonal flu has a value of about 1.5.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO HAVE A LOW R0?

The higher the R0 value, the more difficult it is for health officials to control the spread of the disease.

A number less than one means that the epidemic will run out of steam and be forced to end. In fact, the infectious disease will quickly miss new victims to strike.

HOW IS IT CALCULATED?

Experts use several sources to obtain this information, including NHS hospital admissions, death figures and behavioral contact surveys that ask people how much contact they have with others.

Using mathematical modeling, scientists can then calculate the spread of the virus.

But a delay in the time it takes for coronavirus patients to get sick and die the average predictions of R are still about three weeks behind.

Government scientists released data on the growth rate on Friday. So far, SAGE has only provided details on the rate of R – the average number of people to whom an infected person is likely to transmit the virus.

For the United Kingdom as a whole, the current growth rate is minus 4 percent to minus 2 percent and the estimate of the number of reproductions, called R, remains from 0.7 to 0.9.

The growth rate reflects the speed with which the number of infections is changing day by day and, as the number of infections decreases, is another way of tracking the virus.

If the growth rate is greater than zero, and therefore positive, then the disease will develop, and if the growth rate is less than zero, then the disease will decrease.

It is an approximation of the change in the number of infections each day, and the size of the growth rate indicates the speed of change.

It takes into account a variety of data sources, including government-run Covid-19 surveillance test programs. For example, a growth rate of 5% is faster than a growth rate of 1%, while a disease with a growth rate of minus 4% will decrease faster than a disease with a growth rate of minus 1%.

Estimates of R – which are at least three weeks late – do not indicate how quickly an epidemic evolves and different diseases with the same R can cause epidemics to develop at very different speeds.

Growth rates provide information different from estimates of R, suggesting the size and speed of change, while the R value only provides data on the direction of change.

To calculate R, information on the time it takes for a set of people in an infected group to infect a new set of people in the next group is needed.

However, the growth rate is estimated using a range of data similar to R, but it does not depend on “generation time” and therefore requires fewer assumptions to estimate.

Neither of the two measures – R or growth rate – is better than the other, but each provides useful information for monitoring the spread of a disease. Experts say that everyone should be considered along with other measures of the spread of the disease.

Boris Johnson is expected to unveil a series of new measures over the next fortnight to end the UK lock-in on the back of low R levels and the decrease in infections, hospital admissions and deaths.

Government science advisers plan to cut the two-meter social distance rule in half so that pubs, restaurants and hotels can reopen early next month following a dramatic drop in alert levels to coronavirus.

Bars will be asked to strictly monitor their beer gardens to ensure social distancing and customers will be encouraged to order their drinks via a phone app. In restaurants, staff will not be able to set tables in advance while hotel staff is asked to place room service on the door steps to minimize contact between staff and customers.

There will also be a ban on self-service buffets while towels and cutlery should only be taken out with food, as per the new Times guidelines. The guide also states that all menus must be disposable and discarded after each use.

All hotel guests who fall ill will be obliged to isolate themselves at home or in their hotel room which will be locked for 72 hours after their departure. Gyms will also be asked to impose social distances between their machines – although they are not expected to reopen until the end of the year.

Clubbers may have to wait a while before they can hit the dance floor, as they pose problems of social distancing. Temperature controls and hand sanitizer at the door could be part of the British night when the clubs finally reopen.

Ministers are also negotiating with a dozen other countries – including Spain, Portugal, Greece and France – to set up “ air bridges ” that would allow tourists to travel between them this summer without mandatory quarantine 14 days.

School “bubbles” – which currently allow only 15 students in one class at a time – will also be doubled to allow all children to return to school in September and resume classes.

And NHS bosses will write to more than 2 million vulnerable patients in England who have been protecting themselves since March to assure them that it is safe to go to the shops and exercise outdoors.

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