Boris Johnson’s plan for all elementary students to return to class before summer is “under study”


Boris Johnson dealt a blow to his plans to bring all primary school children to school before last summer vacation last night after education officials said it would be “impossible” for some schools to bring the children safely.

School principals and principals say some primary schools are simply “ too small ” to allow for the implementation of appropriate safety measures to mitigate the risk of coronavirus in time for the return of children. students before summer.

And although hundreds of thousands of elementary school students have returned to schools across the country today, Downing Street now says the government’s plan to recover the remaining 550,000 children before the start of next month is “at the study ”.

According to a survey of the National Governance Association, Britain’s largest school principals union, three of the 4,350 governors interviewed said it was “ unlikely ” that the remaining students would return before school holidays, as indicated. today by The temperature.

Boris Johnson dealt a blow to his plans to bring all primary school children to school before last summer vacation last night after education officials said it would be

Boris Johnson dealt a blow to his plans to bring all primary school children to school before last summer vacation last night after education officials said it would be “impossible” for some schools to bring the children safely. Pictured: 6th grade children at St Dunstan’s College Junior School in London

School principals and principals say some primary schools are simply

School principals and principals say some primary schools are simply “too small” to allow for the implementation of appropriate safety measures in time for students to return before summer. Pictured: children line up to enter the dining hall of St Dunstan’s College in London

Although hundreds of thousands of elementary school students have returned to schools across the country today, Downing Street now claims that the government's plan to recover the remaining 550,000 children before the start of next month is

Although hundreds of thousands of elementary school students have returned to schools across the country today, Downing Street now claims that the government’s plan to recover the remaining 550,000 children before the start of next month is “on the way”. ‘study”. Pictured: children eat lunch at St Dunstan’s College London

Yesterday, more than half a million elementary school children were kept at home while dozens of boards joined the unions to challenge government objectives to facilitate the return of students to school.

At least 54 councils in England have sided with teacher unions, who have argued that it is not yet safe for its members to return to schools amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The boards either told the schools not to reopen, or left the decision to the principals.

This meant that only “40% of eligible primary students” returned to school today, with around 550,000 students staying at home because schools remained closed, expelled children, or even organized “staff training days” .

The Association of School and College Leaders said that among open facilities, attendance is “very variable” and varies between “40% and 70%”.

But union general secretary Geoff Barton said the figure should increase as “parents become more confident about sending their children to school.”

Up to two million students were scheduled to resume classes, but some were refused because school leaders were not ready for them, while about half of the parents chose to keep their children at home due to security concerns.

Meanwhile, Children’s Commissioner Anne Longfield yesterday called on summer students to help students catch up on their studies.

Across the UK, 1st, 6th and Reception students returned to their classes yesterday for the first time since March after schools were forced to close due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

According to the Daily Telegraph, ministers would now consider leaving schools open during the summer to help disadvantaged children cover missed jobs.

Children’s Commissioner Anne Longfield wants summer schools to help students

UK children returned to their classrooms on Monday as schools reopened

In the newspaper, Anne Longfield, the children’s commissioner, said: “ Based in school buildings and operating during the holidays, summer schools could provide activities of all kinds, meals and potentially a bit of food. ‘learning.

“The idea is also likely to be popular with parents, who, although well-meaning and motivated, may need a break from home schooling and may also desperately need child care when go back to work. “

Ms. Longfield was appointed Children’s Commissioner in 2015, with the mission of bringing about long-term change and improvement for all children.

Since taking office, Ms. Longfield has supported several campaigns and programs focused on children’s mental health, vulnerable children and the digital world.

St Michael in The Hamlet Community Primary School in Liverpool has reopened but only to vulnerable people and children of key workers

St Michael in The Hamlet Community Primary School in Liverpool has reopened but only to vulnerable people and children of key workers

Downing Street said the government is considering support for children during the summer months following calls for students in England to be offered remedial lessons.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesperson said, “The Secretary of Education has expressed his commitment to do all he can to ensure that young people do not lose out because of the coronavirus.

“We are exploring additional measures that may be necessary to ensure that each child receives the support they need, including during the summer.”

“As few as 40% of eligible primary students” returned to classes today after the schools closed, the children refused or even the organization of “staff training days”

Yesterday, “only 40% of eligible primary school pupils” returned to class, the schools being closed, driving back the children or even organizing “staff training days”.

The Association of School and College Leaders said that among open facilities, attendance is “very variable” and varies between “40% and 70%”.

But union general secretary Geoff Barton said the figure should increase as “parents become more confident about sending their children to school.”

Up to two million students were scheduled to resume classes, but some were refused because school leaders were not ready for them, while about half of the parents chose to keep their children at home due to security concerns.

It is estimated that up to 1,500 primary schools in England are defying the government’s plan to reintegrate all first and sixth grade children into the classroom from June 1, teachers admit they were feeling nervous. anxiety about returning to work and the unions demanded that the date be pushed back to June 15 at the earliest.

Parents have revealed that many schools will remain closed for at least a week or more, while some have yet to set a date. In other cases, the schools decided that they could only increase the number of places for the children of key workers, not for everyone.

At least two dozen boards, mostly led by the Labor party, have refused to reopen their schools or leave it up to school principals, who are trying to find ways to ensure social distancing in their school buildings and make sure they have enough teachers to teach ten kids “ bubbles ”.

But while hundreds of thousands of young students are back in class and reunited with their friends and teachers yesterday, MailOnline may reveal that there was confusion in several schools in London, with some parents arriving with their children only to be informed that they could not enter and had to go home.

Parents from Winsor’s primary school in east London were turned away yesterday and told teachers that they were still making arrangements.

Glauciane Conti was turned back at the door of the school with her son who is in the first year.

The Forest Gate cleaner, 35, said, “ My son just went to ask the teachers and they said it was not open because they were still making arrangements. I do not understand. Now I have to go to work. ” Gallions Elementary School, also in Beckton, plans to remain closed to the general public this week.

Hanif Hazari, 58, accompanied his son Mahmamudullabi who is a grade 6 student at Havelock Primary School in Southall, west London, after being informed by text that he would reopen following the easing of the locking.

Mr. Hazari said: “ The playground was completely deserted, so I went to the school office and they told me that the school had now decided to stay closed and that they had not still in date as to its opening. It’s very confusing, I don’t know what’s going on. The government seems to say one thing and the schools seem to say another. Mahmamudullabi, 11, added: “I hope the school opens soon because I am really bored at home.”

Jaswinder Grover, who arrived at school with his daughter Simran, a grade 6 student, said: “ I was first told that the school would reopen today, but as you can see, almost no one only came. And now the school is telling me something completely different. The government needs to be clearer about what is really going on and when our children can go back to school, which I hope will be soon.

A Havelock Primary official told MailOnline that the school should not reopen until June 15 at the earliest. He added, “Some parents felt like we were opening on June 1. We are sorry for any confusion that has been caused, and the parents will be notified as soon as possible.”

A government source denied that the situation was “chaotic”, insisting that the return process seemed to be going well. “Many schools are welcoming more and more students, the participation rate is in line with expectations,” said the source. “We have always said that schools will start reopening more widely this week, it will be a gradual process.”

As schools reopened for the first time in ten weeks, it also appeared yesterday:

  • Public health officials are warning that the lockout has been relaxed and I think the rules are becoming impossible to enforce. The beaches were crowded due to the continuous good weather;
  • Britain has been offered a multitude of new freedoms – including meeting with friends and family, reopening some stores and returning students. But health experts warn that there is “no reason” to let two million people who “protected” Covid go outside;
  • Huge queues formed outside of Ikea as the government allowed more stores, markets and car showrooms to open;

Child’s temperature taken at Harris Primary Academy in south London as up to 2 million students had to return to class

A child is being disinfected with the help of a staff member from a primary school in Croydon this morning

children jumped into the playground under the eyes of full PEP teachers

A child has his hands disinfected with the help of a staff member from a primary school in Croydon this morning. As the children jumped into the playground under the gaze of the teachers in full PEP

First grade children have their own desks at the modern Harris Academy Primary School in South London. Many school leaders with older schools say they don't have the space

First grade children have their own desks at the modern Harris Academy Primary School in South London. Many school leaders with older schools say they don’t have the space

A child is dropped off at Queen's Hill Elementary School, Costessey, Norfolk at reception, first and sixth grade pupils return across England

A child is dropped off at Queen’s Hill Elementary School, Costessey, Norfolk at reception, first and sixth grade pupils return across England

Receptionist Braydon washes his hands while watching an electronic timer at Queen's Hill Elementary School, Costessey, Norfolk. Children will be asked to wash regularly throughout the day

Receptionist Braydon washes his hands while watching an electronic timer at Queen’s Hill Elementary School, Costessey, Norfolk. Children will be asked to wash regularly throughout the day

A girl arrives for her first day back at Watlington Primary School in Oxfordshire

A girl arrives for her first day back at St Michael in the Hamlet Community Primary School in Liverpool

Children arrive for their first day back at Watlington Primary School (left) in Oxfordshire and to St Michael in Hamlet Community Primary School in Liverpool (right)

2m markings and social distance signs at Ashton Gate Primary School in Bristol as children return after lockout

2m markings and social distance signs at Ashton Gate Primary School in Bristol as children return after lockout

How most union-led boards refused to obey government and open elementary schools on June 1

Opposite

Brighton and Hove (Work)

Slough (work)

Teesside’s work)

Solihull (Conservative)

Stockport (Work)

Bury (Work)

Liverpool (Labor)

Hartlepool (Work)

Wirrall (Work)

Calderdale (Work)

Birmingham (Labor)

Bradford (work)

Leeds (Labor)

Expressed “ reservations ” but left it to schools

Wakefield (Work)

Barking and Dagenham (work)

Redbridge (Work)

Bristol (Labor)

Southampton (work)

Newcastle (Work)

However, Children’s Commissioner Anne Longfield believes that schools will need to organize summer courses to allow students to make up for the work they missed during the forced break.

Longfield said in The Telegraph: “Based in school buildings and operating during the holidays, summer schools could provide all kinds of activities, meals and potentially some learning,” she said. .

“The idea is also likely to be popular with parents, who, although well-meaning and motivated, may need a break from home schooling and may also desperately need child care when go back to work. “

A teacher wrote this morning, “Many of us will feel very worried and anxious about the new changes, but it seems in our school. We stand in solidarity. ”

Cathy Moden, principal of the Hiltingbury Infant School at Chandler’s Ford, Hampshire, said she had expected 45 of the 90 children at the reception to attend on Monday, but only 39 showed up.

Moden said: “I expect it to increase, I think some parents have made a decision on what they have heard in the media, I have heard some parents that they are not ready yet to send their children.

Queen’s Hill Elementary and Kindergarten near Norwich reopened to accommodate children on Monday, with 46 students out of a total of 75 in the year group.

The school has been open to children of key workers throughout the coronavirus shutdown, with plans to reopen for kindergarten children next week and first and sixth grade children starting June 15.

Emma Corps, 39, was in a line of socially distant parents as she dropped her five-year-old daughter Isla at the door of the school.

“I was a little anxious but she was excited and I think they have to go back to school because there has to be some kind of normalcy in their lives,” she said.

“During the 10 weeks, she said” when will I go back, when will I go back? then at 6:30 this morning it was “mom, quickly”!

Jo Frost, 37, who dropped off his five-year-old son Max at Queen’s Hill Elementary and Kindergarten near Norwich, said: “ This is obviously a difficult decision, but you have to weigh everything life.

“You can’t just lock yourself in and wrap yourself in cotton. You can just go out and anything can happen.

“The school has really thought about it. They sent a lot of letters, photos and gave us all the information we need. I am convinced that they are doing everything correctly. To be honest, we were quite relieved because it’s been a long time since he left and at his age, it’s really important to be with his peers.

Penny Sheppard, principal of Kindergarten and kindergarten at Queen’s Hill near Norwich, which reopened to children on Monday, said: “ I think if I’m being honest, a lot of principals were very surprised by June 1st because I think we had been doing a lot of reading on things in the media.

“Many of us probably thought” OK, we won’t have any children back until September “. But like everything you take in your stride, right?

“ You think so, okay, after this shock announcement, let’s logically think about it and let’s just start an action plan to get there.

“We were open throughout this process and I had 60 children (of key workers) in child care, so I know the systems I have put in place are working and the children, I kept separate “pods”.

“I knew it was just an extension of that.”

A child bubbles at Watlington Elementary School during lunch break on the first day of return for many children

A child bubbles at Watlington Elementary School during lunch break on the first day of return for many children

A teacher during an outdoor class at Watlington Elementary School while some schools reopen as the lock decreases

A teacher during an outdoor class at Watlington Elementary School while some schools reopen as the lock decreases

Schools, like this one in Norfolk, use fruit to indicate where children should sit in their class bubbles, which are fewer than ten

Schools, like this one in Norfolk, use fruit to indicate where children should sit in their class bubbles, which are fewer than ten

One year, 6 years old, Laurent returns to a school in Bristol with his mother today - most children do not wear uniforms to ensure that children wear clean clothes every day

One year, 6 years old, Laurent returns to a school in Bristol with his mother today – most children do not wear uniforms to ensure that children wear clean clothes every day

Summer camps can be set up to allow children to catch up on lessons after school closings. Grand Opening of Queen's Hill Elementary School, Costessey, Norfolk

Summer camps can be set up to allow children to catch up on lessons after school closings. Grand Opening of Queen’s Hill Elementary School, Costessey, Norfolk

Students will begin returning to classrooms across England today at Heath Mount Prep School in Watton-at-Stone, offices have been moved to maintain the rules of social distancing

Students will begin returning to classrooms across England today at Heath Mount Prep School in Watton-at-Stone, offices have been moved to maintain the rules of social distancing

Offices have been saved with smaller classrooms in some schools, including Holywell Village First School in Northumberland

Offices have been saved with smaller classrooms in some schools, including Holywell Village First School in Northumberland

Freddie Noble, six, and little brother Will, three, return to school today in West Norfolk

Freddie Noble, six, and little brother Will, three, return to school today in West Norfolk

CONFIRMED CORONAVIRUS STUDY IN PRIMARY SCHOOL

A Gloucestershire elementary school sent a letter to parents last week confirming that someone at the school had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Woolaston Elementary School in Lydney believes the person contracted the disease from a school holiday camp and sent the parents letters last week.

She steps in as schools across the country reopen on Monday for reception kids, year 1 and year 6.

Emma Gomersall, the acting principal of Woolaston Elementary, confirmed that the school had carried out a thorough cleaning on Wednesday and Thursday.

Ministers are in talks on summer camps to allow disadvantaged children, as well as a “catch-up bonus” that will provide schools with additional funding for initiatives to help the most affected students.

This comes as the Secretary of Education, Gavin Williamson, acknowledged that the recent school closings would have the greatest impact on the poorest children.

An announcement is expected in the coming weeks, despite objections from teacher unions if the plans include working during the summer.

This could lead to another argument between the government and the unions, in the face of Ms. Longfield’s concerns that students may be out of school for up to six months.

History teacher Chris Beach said, “First day back to school today. In Guernsey, we are fortunate not to have any active cases, but I am concerned for friends and former colleagues from the United Kingdom – stay safe for everyone.

Another commented on “Anxiety through the roof for many” because primary school students at reception, in grades one and six, can return to school after 10 weeks of absence.

Schools have been preparing to reopen classrooms for weeks, hallways have been demarcated to separate students during their school day, while offices have also been moved to maintain a distance of two meters between schools.

Four-year-old Bowie Cool and his mother Lozzie Cool of West Sussex went for a school walk on Sunday to prepare for a return to school this morning.

Four-year-old Bowie Cool and his mother Lozzie Cool of West Sussex went for a school walk on Sunday to prepare for a return to school this morning.

Children as young as four are placed in bubbles of social distancing in classrooms and play areas to prevent the spread of Covid-19 germs

Children as young as four are placed in bubbles of social distancing in classrooms and play areas to prevent the spread of Covid-19 germs

Corridors have been marked out to separate students from a school in Northumberland

Corridors have been marked out to separate students from a school in Northumberland

Charlotte Church ‘alarmist’ is lambasted over ‘hate speech’ call for English parents to keep kids out of school in a Twitter rant

Charlotte Church suffered today from an avalanche of criticism after urging English parents not to send their children to school, saying that Boris Johnson does not “ give madness ” about them.

The extraordinary explosion of Twitter from the 34-year-old mother of two arrived despite the singer living in Wales where the schools will remain closed until September.

S’adressant à Twitter dimanche matin, elle a écrit: “ Je recommande vivement si vous pouvez l’aider, ne renvoyez pas vos enfants à l’école demain ….. ce gouvernement ne donne pas de folie sur vous, vos enfants, vos aînés ou vos vulnérables.

Les parents qui souhaitent que leurs enfants retournent à l’école ont accusé la star de les avoir “humiliés”, l’un d’eux disant: “Quelle déclaration incitative ridicule et haineuse”. Une autre a répondu à son message en disant: «C’est choquant. Il y a beaucoup d’enfants qui n’ont reçu aucune éducation au cours des 10 dernières semaines. En tant que mère, j’aurais pensé avoir compris l’importance de cela ».

Et les critiques ont également souligné que les conseils de Mme Church aux parents ayant des enfants dans l’école ordinaire sont venus malgré sa décision de l’école à la maison de sa propre progéniture depuis 2016.

L’année dernière, elle a enragé sa communauté de Glamorgan en transformant sa maison de 2,5 millions de livres sterling en une école privée où elle espère «libérer» des enfants jusqu’à 20 enfants. Un voisin a déclaré: “Elle n’a aucune formation ni expérience dans la gestion d’une école”. Mme Church homeschools ses propres enfants Ruby, 11 ans, et Dexter, 10 ans, et affirme qu’elle s’engage maintenant à donner aux autres enfants de leur région la liberté de quoi apprendre.

La plupart des enseignants ont des classes réduites, qui fonctionneront dans des bulles, sans interaction avec les autres classes.

Pour les plus jeunes, les jouets ont été retirés de la salle de classe et sont conservés dans un entrepôt de peur de pouvoir contenir les germes de Covid-19.

Brian Walton, directeur de la Brookside Academy à Somerset, a parlé à Good Morning Britain avant l’arrivée des élèves à partir de 7h30.

Il a déclaré: “ Comme les chefs d’établissement de haut en bas du pays, nous avons planifié cela probablement depuis le début du verrouillage. Il a fallu une consultation méticuleuse des plans avec le personnel et les parents.

«Comme la plupart des professeurs en ce moment, je suis content que ce soit un début très précoce car je n’aurais probablement pas dormi de toute façon.

Les enfants courent un risque extrêmement faible d’attraper un coronavirus. La majorité des admissions à l’hôpital sont des personnes de plus de 60 ans.

La principale préoccupation des élèves qui retournent à l’école est la propagation potentielle des germes entre les différents ménages, tandis que les enseignants qui pourraient être à risque pourraient également être exposés.

School leaders also predicted that more than one in five teachers would be forced to work from home because of health problems, age or the vulnerability of family members.

Le codirecteur Matt Ferris de l’école primaire de Kingsholm a expliqué bon nombre des nouvelles fonctionnalités en réponse aux questions des parents sur la façon dont leurs enfants s’adapteront aux mesures de distanciation sociale,

Ils se verront attribuer un créneau horaire et une zone – ou un enclos – où ils laisseront leur enfant avant de se diriger le long d’une passerelle désignée.

On demandera aux élèves de maintenir une distance sociale entre les autres et ils ne seront autorisés à se mélanger qu’à un petit nombre d’autres.

Les étudiants qui ne se conforment pas aux règles de distanciation sociale seront également renvoyés chez eux selon une politique en trois temps.

Dans une vidéo publiée sur le site Web de l’école, M. Ferris explique aux parents ce à quoi ils peuvent s’attendre lorsque les enfants de 6e, 1e année et d’accueil et de la maternelle reviennent le 1er juin.

Les heures de dépôt et de collecte seront échelonnées avec des files d’attente et des allées balisées pour les parents et les élèves à suivre.

Kingsholm utilise des plages horaires basées sur les noms de famille, les parents étant invités à déposer leurs enfants seuls, sans frères et sœurs ou autres enfants.

L'école primaire catholique St Joseph à Hertford a préparé ses salles de classe pour le retour des élèves

L’école primaire catholique St Joseph à Hertford a préparé ses salles de classe pour le retour des élèves

Que puis-je faire pour réduire les mesures de verrouillage en Angleterre?

Les règles sur les coronavirus changent en Angleterre à partir d’aujourd’hui, voici quelques choses importantes à garder à l’esprit.

Puis-je rencontrer plus de gens?

À partir du 1er juin, vous pourrez rencontrer jusqu’à six personnes de ménages différents, dans des espaces extérieurs.

Cela signifie que vous pouvez rencontrer un nombre limité de membres de votre famille et d’amis dans les jardins et les parcs, mais vous devez continuer à suivre les règles de distanciation sociale.

Vous pouvez faire du sport avec les personnes que vous rencontrez, mais seulement s’il est possible de garder un espace de deux mètres entre vous, comme le tennis ou le football.

Mes enfants iront-ils à l’école?

Les écoles primaires peuvent commencer à s’ouvrir pour les élèves de la réception, année 1 et année 6 à partir du lundi.

Les enfants vulnérables et les enfants des travailleurs clés peuvent toujours aller en classe, et l’enseignement peut commencer pour les élèves plus âgés de 10e et 12e année dans deux semaines, le lundi 15 juin.

D’autres magasins seront-ils ouverts?

La plupart des magasins non essentiels resteront fermés lundi, mais les salles d’exposition de voitures et les marchés extérieurs seront autorisés à rouvrir.

D’autres magasins non essentiels peuvent recommencer à commercer à partir du 15 juin.

Puis-je faire une sortie?

Les excursions d’une journée vers des espaces extérieurs sont autorisées tant que vous ne restez pas la nuit. Pendant un voyage, les gens doivent maintenir une distance sociale et les hôtels sont toujours fermés.

Y aura-t-il encore des sanctions pour avoir enfreint les règles?

Oui, et les amendes pour ceux qui enfreignent les règles ont été augmentées.

Les pénalités pour une première infraction sont désormais fixées à 100 £ (réduites à 50 £ si elles sont payées dans les deux semaines) et doublent pour chaque infraction subséquente aux règles, jusqu’à 3 200 £.

Si je protège, puis-je quitter la maison?

A partir de lundi, les deux millions de personnes qui ont blindé en Angleterre peuvent désormais quitter la maison pour passer du temps avec des gens à l’extérieur.

Les personnes considérées comme extrêmement vulnérables pourront sortir avec des membres de leur ménage, tout en continuant à suivre les directives de distanciation sociale.

And those who live alone can meet someone else from another household outside, also adhering to the social distancing guidelines.

Quelles sont les règles au Pays de Galles?

À partir de lundi, les personnes de deux ménages au Pays de Galles pourront se rencontrer à l’extérieur, à condition de ne pas parcourir plus de cinq miles et d’observer une distance sociale.

Les personnes qui ont été protégées pourront également faire de l’exercice à l’extérieur et rencontrer des personnes d’un autre ménage, mais ne doivent pas entrer dans une autre maison ou partager de la nourriture.

Quelles sont les règles en Ecosse?

Depuis vendredi, les personnes au nord de la frontière sont autorisées à se réunir en groupes de huit, à l’extérieur dans des parcs ou des jardins, mais ces rassemblements ne peuvent inclure que des membres de deux ménages distincts.

Il n’y a eu aucun changement aux règles pour les personnes qui protègent.

Quelles sont les règles en Irlande du Nord?

Certaines règles seront assouplies en Irlande du Nord le 8 juin.

En une semaine, quelques magasins supplémentaires tels que des salles d’exposition de voitures peuvent ouvrir et des mariages en plein air pourront avoir lieu, mais limités à moins de dix personnes.

Les animaux domestiques peuvent également se rendre dans les salons de toilettage et les installations sportives extérieures seront autorisées à ouvrir.

Les élèves seront déposés par les parents dans des enclos qui seront sectionnés de barrières à leur arrivée.

Les parents ont cependant exprimé leurs propres inquiétudes, Vix Lowthion a écrit: «Mes enfants ne retourneront pas à l’école demain. J’ai passé des semaines à essayer d’influencer la gestion pathétique de la pandémie par ce gouvernement.

«J’en suis maintenant au point où je dois protéger mes propres enfants, leurs enseignants et leurs familles. C’est la chose responsable à faire.

Cependant, d’autres parents sont satisfaits du retour à la vie scolaire, un père affirmant que son enfant allait devenir fou pendant le verrouillage.

Last night, the ministers reassured parents by telling them that the reopening of primary schools today is safe, because it is feared that up to a million children will be left out.

Housing secretary Robert Jenrick said it was “extremely important” that children return to school.

This comes from a study suggesting that up to half of families could avoid sending their kids to school due to concerns about the spread of the coronavirus.

That means that a million children, half of those The reception, year 1 and year 6, could be suspended, which undermines the government’s hopes of returning to normal.

The majority of the primaries should open from today, despite fierce opposition from the National Education Union.

At the 11th hour, the union again tried to sabotage the openings, saying that they should be delayed until June 15 to protect young people and teachers.

Les syndicats s’opposent également avec véhémence à la création de cours d’été pour les enfants vulnérables. On pense que les mineurs considèrent cela comme une possibilité de s’assurer que les élèves obtiennent les meilleures opportunités.

Le Dr Mary Bousted, secrétaire générale conjointe du Syndicat national de l’éducation (NEU), a déclaré que les enseignants de Sky ne devraient pas avoir à travailler pendant les vacances d’été.

Elle a déclaré à Sophy Ridge de Sky dimanche: «Les enseignants travaillent d’arrache-pied pour dispenser une éducation aux enfants à la maison.

“Donc, ce qui devrait arriver, c’est – et nous le soutenons – des clubs et des activités sur une base volontaire.”

But Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson tried to allay the concerns of parents and staff, insisting that government decisions throughout the pandemic are “based on the best scientific and medical advice.”

He said, “While there may be some nervousness, I want to reassure parents and teachers that the well-being of children and staff continues to be at the center of all of our considerations.

“For the past three weeks, the sector has been planning and implementing protective measures.”

Speaking at the Downing Street briefing, Jenrick said the ministers believe it is “safe to open schools”. He pointed out that 80% of schools were open throughout the pandemic, with thousands of teachers already educating the children of key workers as well as vulnerable students.

Jenrick said: “ There may be parents today who have not yet made the decision to send their children back to school, but will do so in the coming days when they will have seen others take this step and the schools will successfully reopen.

“I hope so, because it is extremely important to bring the children back to school.

“ All the evidence suggests that it is the children of the poorest and poorest households who lose out because they lack the crucial face-to-face contact you get in school. I don’t want this to continue any longer.

Government security measures include the return of elementary school students with access to coronavirus tests, as well as symptomatic family members. They will be kept in small groups of more than 15 socially distant people throughout the day, with breaks, lunches, refunds and staggered pickups.

Assistant Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Jenny Harries said at the press conference that testing capacity across the country “is now very important”, up to 200,000 per day.

She stressed that “the risks of social interactions are reduced” because the students will be kept in small groups. Boris Johnson hopes that crèches and providers of early childhood reopen today and that primary schools allow the return of their host groups, first and sixth grade.

Certain students in grades 10 and 12 will be allowed to meet face-to-face with their teachers in secondary school from June 15.

The majority of the primaries should reopen. But many admit only a fraction of eligible students, with the introduction of rotas, because they find it difficult to adapt to smaller classes and reduced teacher levels.

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick says it is

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick says it is “extremely important” that children go back to school

The National Foundation for Educational Research interviewed 1,233 principals in public primary and secondary schools in England.

They expect that almost half (46%) of families will keep their children at home because of their concerns about the coronavirus or the need to isolate themselves. This figure is slightly higher for primary schools (47%) compared to 42% for secondary schools.

In all schools, those with the highest proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals – an indicator of poverty – estimate this figure at 50%. This compares to 42% in schools that have low levels of disadvantaged students.

Trois mères envisagent de lancer une bataille juridique avec le gouvernement affirmant que la fermeture d’écoles pendant la crise du coronavirus pourrait avoir violé les droits humains de leurs enfants

By Jim Norton for the Daily Mail

Three mothers can sue the government for closing schools, saying it may have violated the human rights of children.

They wrote to Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson to ask if the mental well-being of the students had been taken into account.

They also fear that draconian social distancing rules for returning from school may cause long-term psychological damage.

Liz Cole, 46, one of three mothers who organized the Us for Them campaign

Christine Brett, 48, is one of three mothers who wrote to education secretary Gavin Williamson asking if the mental well-being of the students had been taken into account.

Fears for well-being: activists Liz Cole, 46, left, and Christine Brett, 48, right, are two mothers who could sue the government for closing schools

Activist Christine Brett, who has two children, said: “ These are healthy children who have been quarantined for 12 weeks – they should not be treated as germs, disinfected at the entrance and separated on individual tables. ”

Schools will return today for certain age groups for the first time since March 20.

The three mothers launched the Us for Them campaign for parents who say they felt like outcasts for disagreeing with children kept at home because of Covid-19. Molly Kingsley, 41, Liz Cole, 46, and Mrs. Brett, 48, all from Cambridgeshire, have one child who returns to school and one at home.

They said the evidence that locking in hurts the well-being of young people may have been overlooked. The group also opposes extreme distancing because it could violate the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Former Lawyer Molly Kingsley (Photo) is One of Three Mothers Who Said Evidence That Locking Down Affects Young People's Well-Being May Have Been Overlooked

Former Lawyer Molly Kingsley (Photo) is One of Three Mothers Who Said Evidence That Locking Down Affects Young People’s Well-Being May Have Been Overlooked

They asked the lawyers to examine whether the government’s actions so far and the distancing plans may have been illegal.

The former lawyer, Ms. Kingsley, said that if she did not take into account the welfare of the children, they were ready to continue. Nearly 2,000 parents and teachers supported the campaign.

A spokesperson for the Department of Education insisted that the well-being of children was “at the heart of all considerations”.

Children and youth will experience high levels of loneliness and depression for NINE YEARS after the lockout ends

Children and youth are likely to experience high rates of depression and anxiety long after the lockdown ends, according to a review.

The research builds on more than 60 pre-existing peer-reviewed studies on topics covering isolation, loneliness and mental health for young people aged four to 21.

He concludes that young people who are alone may be up to three times more likely to develop depression in the future, and that the impact of loneliness and mental health could last at least nine years.

The study authors, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, said that clinical services must be prepared for a future spike in demand.

He concludes that young people who are alone may be up to three times more likely to develop depression in the future

He concludes that young people who are alone may be up to three times more likely to develop depression in the future

Study comes as NHS England’s top child and youth mental health doctor urged parents to watch for signs of anxiety, distress or bad mood as some students return to school on Monday .

Dr. Maria Loades, clinical psychologist in the Department of Psychology at the University of Bath, said: “ From our analysis, it is clear that there are strong associations between loneliness and depression in young people, both immediate and long term.

“We know that this effect can sometimes be delayed, which means it can take up to 10 years to fully understand the magnitude of the mental health impact that the Covid-19 crisis has created.

“There is evidence that the duration of loneliness as opposed to intensity seems to have the greatest impact on rates of depression among young people.

“This means it is of course important to return to a certain level of normality as soon as possible.

“However, how this process is managed is important when it comes to shaping young people’s feelings and experiences about this period.

Experts say schools should be resourced and given clear guidelines on how to support children's emotional well-being during the transition period.

Experts say schools should be resourced and given clear guidelines on how to support children’s emotional well-being during the transition period.

“For our youngest children and their return to school from this week, we must give priority to the importance of play to help them reconnect with their friends and adapt after this intense period of isolation. “

Members of the review team also participated in a recent open letter to the Secretary of Education, Gavin Williamson.

They suggest that the loosening of the lock should be done in a way that gives children time and the opportunity to play with their peers.

Schools should be resourced and given clear guidelines on how to support children’s emotional well-being during the transition to school reopening, experts say.

They ask that play – rather than academic progress – be the priority during this period.

Their letter concludes: “Poor emotional health in children leads to long-term mental health problems, lower education and a considerable economic burden.

Professor Prathiba Chitsabesan, NHS England Associate National Clinical Director for Child and Youth Mental Health, said returning to school could cause anxiety for some students and those who stayed at home feeling isolated or left out.

She noted that the NHS mental health services remain available for children and young people.

“ Children and youth can experience a variety of feelings in response to the coronavirus pandemic, including anxiety, distress, and bad mood, and it is important to understand that these are normal responses to a abnormal situation, ” said Professor Chitsabesan.

“ The NHS offers a large amount of mental health support for children and youth, and if a child needs urgent mental health support or advice, see nhs.uk for services in your area. , including 24/7 crisis support.

NHS England has given advice on what parents should watch out for and what to do to take care of their child’s mental health.

The signs include that children are more upset or have trouble managing their emotions, that they seem anxious or distressed, that they have more trouble sleeping and eating, that they are in a bad mood, than they report worried thoughts or that they pee more in bed in young children.

Parents can help by taking the time to talk to their children, allowing them to talk about their feelings, trying to understand their problems, helping their child do positive activities, trying to follow a routine and being taking care of their own mental health.

Nadine Dorries, Minister of Mental Health, said: “ As many children start going back to school, it is essential that we continue to provide them with the support they need to maintain their mental health and well-being. -be and deal with any feeling of uncertainty or worry that they might be. experience.

“The NHS stays there for those who need it and our mental health services are adapting to better support families and children as we all get used to these routine changes.”

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